Accessibility Talks

September Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - Love thy Keyboard

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

Keyboard accessibility is vital, as many assistive devices emulate the keyboard. Using semantic HTML one can achieve an accessible User Interface (UI) with less code than non-semantic markup.

By managing and guiding focus with semantic HTML, developing an accessible UI is rather easy. Semantic HTML plays an important role in not only accessibility but SEO (Search Engine Optimization) as well. Although we are aware of it, it's often overlooked.

In September’s accessibility talk, Sarbbottam Bandyopadhyay shared the trade-offs of using semantic vs non-semantic markup with an everyday example. He also shared how to manage and guide focus. It was a brief presentation emphasizing the various aspects of keyboard accessibility. He concluded with a brief introduction to WAI-ARIA.

Sarbbottam is a frontend engineer, with more than 14 years experience. He currently works at LinkedIn. He is part of LinkedIn's core accessibility team, focusing primarily on web accessibility. He’s been involved with web accessibility since his Yahoo days. Read more about September Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - Love thy Keyboard

August Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - A11Y Meetups, Camps, and Beyond

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

Dennis Deacon has been involved in digital accessibility for the past four years, most recently as an Accessibility Engineer with The Paciello Group. He’s led the Chicago Digital Accessibility & Inclusive Design Meetup since December 2014. He is organizing Chicago's first Accessibility Camp later this year. And, he leads the curation of the 24 Accessibility article series.

Dennis Deacon spoke about starting the Chicago Digital Accessibility and Inclusive Design Meetup. He spoke about digital accessibility but focused on delivering the most accessible events possible. Read more about August Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - A11Y Meetups, Camps, and Beyond

June Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - What's New with WCAG 2.1

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

The June A11y Talk welcomed back Drupal Core Accessibility Maintainer, Andrew Macpherson. The “What's New with WCAG 2.1” talk discussed the new guidelines that were released in early June.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1) extends WCAG 2.0 and is intended as an interim until WCAG 3.0 is released. The new guidelines were needed due to advancements in technology and to fix some gaps and shortcomings in the earlier guidelines. Some of the new guidelines cover touch/mobile devices, speech control, and cognitive disability support. Read more about June Accessibility (A11Y) Talks - What's New with WCAG 2.1

April Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

This month’s Accessibility Talk was an encore presentation of the panel’s Core Conversation at DrupalCon Nashville: Core Accessibility: Building Inclusivity into the Drupal Project
Helena McCabeCatherine McNally, and Carie Fisher discussed the fundamentals of accessibility and how they can be injected further into the Drupal project. All three are accessibility specialists in their fields. Read more about April Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

March Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

In March, A11y Talks welcomed Melanie Sumner, an application architect from JP Morgan Chase. She is an accessibility advocate and is an EmberJS core team member and meetup organizer in Chicago. The tagline for Ember is "the framework for building ambitious applications". Melanie spoke of ways to inject accessibility into not only the Ember project, but into other single-page applications so some users are not left behind. Read more about March Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

January Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

In January, we were happy to have Ashley Bischoff as our guest speaker. Ashley talked about embracing plain language for better accessibility. Ashley is an accessibility expert and copy editor for The Paciello Group.

Writing reports and documentation is nothing new for many of us — we write them all the time. But even though we may do our best to write clearly, those who receive our reports and documentation might not be as familiar with accessibility as we are.

At the end of the day, no matter how technically correct a document may be, our words won't do much good if those who are reading them can't understand what we're trying to say. But writing isn't a black box — there are straightforward techniques that we can use to help ensure that our writing remains accessible. Read more about January Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

December Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

As an early holiday present, for December's meet-up we had a very special accessibility guest, Heydon Pickering who chatted about "Prioritizing Accessibility.” For those of you who are veterans of the world of website accessibility, you probably already know a lot about what Heydon has contributed to our field. But for those of you new to this field, let me take a quick minute to give you some more background on our speaker. Read more about December Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

November Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

This month we did something a little bit different with the meet-up format. Instead of one person presenting a slide deck, we had a panel discussion on all things accessibility with four accessibility experts - Eric Bailey, Helena McCabe, Scott O'Hara, and Scott Vinkle!

There were some questions lined up to keep the conversation going, but we ended up having some amazing on-the-fly questions from the audience, so it was a bit more spontaneous and a lot of fun! Read more about November Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

October Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Drop wheelchair moving toward Drupal 8 drop logo

This month we had Nicolas Steenhout joining us to talk about "Accessibility: Don't turn off that JavaScript just yet."

The year is 2017, and JavaScript has never been as ubiquitous. Long gone are the days when in order to be considered accessible, pages had to work flawlessly without scripting. Scripting has also come a long way, and developers are now even leveraging the powers of JavaScript to rewrite content in order to make it more accessible to assistive technologies. Read more about October Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Pages